Monthly Archives: July 2018

43 – Superbad: SUPERMAN III (1983) – A Podcast Film Review



Gone is Richard Donner, gone is Gene Hackman, and gone is the epic feel of the SUPERMAN series with SUPERMAN III, in which the creators finally wrest the controls away to make what they’ve been wanting to make all along: comedies!  Richard Lester returns as director, as Superman, once again played by Christopher Reeve, has to battle a genius computer hacker played by Richard Pryor from assisting megalomaniac businessman Robert Vaughn from taking over the economic future of the world through computer dominance.


42 – We See DC: SUPERMAN II (1980) – A Podcast Film Review



A patchwork film that somehow still works great as a piece of entertainment, despite the switch in directors from Richard Donner to Richard Lester a great deal of the way through.  Three power-hungry Kryptonians travel to Earth to dominate it, and the only one who can match them is Superman.  Alas, he’s nowhere to be found, and has even sacrificed his powers in order to be with Lois Lane.  More emphasis on humor and action than the first time out has some proclaiming that SUPERMAN II is better than the first.  I debate my own feelings on which is better on this episode.  Christopher Reeve, Margot Kidder and Gene Hackman star, along with Terence Stamp as Zod.


41 – We See DC: SUPERMAN (1978) A Podcast Film Review



The granddaddy of the modern-day superhero flick, 1978’s SUPERMAN put together a truly epic experience befitting a popular hero on the magnitude of Superman. Richard Donner directed DC Comics’ legendary property from his infancy on the planet Krypton all the way to donning the cape and costume to right wrongs wherever he may find them on Earth as savior of humanity.  With treacherous mastermind Lex Luthor out and about, no one is safe, even Superman, if he has his way.  Christopher Reeve, Margot Kidder, Gene Hackman and Marlon Brando star in this grand action-adventure with lots of soaring sounds from composer John Williams and fun character touches from a capable cast.


40 – We See DC: BATMAN (1989) – A Podcast Film Review



One of the biggest blockbusters of the 1980s, and of all time, Tim Burton would take the reins of Warner Bros. hugest hit with 1989’s BATMAN, a much more dark and eerie take on the character than any prior screen take to date.  With a tremendous Danny Elfman score, hit singles by Prince, and a very energetic Jack Nicholson performance as Joker, it would be the movie to watch for its era, despite the Michael Keaton casting backlash leading up to its release.